Te Mana o te Moana: the State of the Climate in the Pacific 2020 is Greenpeace's landmark report exploring how climate change has impacted Pacific Island Countries; who is responsible; and what is needed to ensure that the people of the Pacific emerge stronger from the climate crisis.

















The climate crisis remains the single greatest threat to Pacific communities, compounding and amplifying all other development challenges. 

Despite this, the Pacific story is one of resilience amid crisis. The solutions are being found in both age-old traditions and modern technology, and give cause for hope if we act in time.

But the Pacific communities can't go it alone. As a major power in the Pacific, Australia must do all it can to reduce its national emissions in line with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5 degrees pathway.
Sign now to demand the Australian Federal Government to take urgent climate action.

TOP 5 REPORT FINDINGS

FINDING 1

Pacific Island Countries (PICs) are already facing severe harm from climate change, even at 1.1 degrees of warming, including cyclones, king tides, and loss of agricultural land and fresh water.

FINDING 2

PICs are among the nations of the world least responsible for creating the climate crisis. The highest 15 emitting nations together produce 73.51 per cent of annual global emissions, while Pacific Island Countries (14) produce just 0.141 per cent.

FINDING 3

None of the top 15 greenhouse gas emitters have pledged emissions reductions, via their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), that are consistent with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5 degree heating limit. Countries with NDCs that lock in at least 2 degrees of heating are responsible for 65.18 per cent of annual global emissions.

FINDING 4

If all current pledges to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by the world’s nations are achieved, the world is still projected to heat by between 2.2 to 3.4 degrees celsius. Current policies see the world projected to heat by a median estimate of 2.9 degrees by 2100, with a possible range of 2.1 to 3.9 degrees celsius. This level of heating will render entire Pacific islands uninhabitable. Despite this, the Pacific story is one of resilience amid crisis. The solutions are being found in both age-old traditions and modern technology, and give cause for hope if we act in time.

FINDING 5

The world must put in place plans to reduce emissions to keep heating below 1.5 degrees as soon as possible. Australia has a special obligation to lead, as a major emitter and a significant power in the Pacific.

As a major power in the Pacific, Australia must do all it can to reduce its national emissions in line with the Paris Agreement’s 1.5 degrees pathway.
Take action to demand world leaders commit to building a better, more just world for ourselves and for generations to come.

Want to increase your impact? We're telling these truths through our upcoming documentary, Finding Hope: Samoa - a film about climate change in the Pacific, told by the Pacific.

Call: 1800 815 151

Authorised by K.Smolski, Lvl 2, 33 Mountain Street, Ultimo NSW 2007

Connect with us

© Greenpeace 2019. Read our Privacy Policy